Snowshoeing

Here’s some informaton from Patty Mash of the Discovery Center at the Deep Creek Lake State Park:
Snowshoe History:
From Europe to North America to Asia, people began using snowshoes over 3,000 years ago out of basic need to find food and explore new territories in the wintertime. Snowshoeing flourished among the native people in North America. Before long, savvy European trappers, hunters, explorers and surveyors adopted snowshoes as their own.

How To Snowshoe:
Snowshoeing is as easy as walking; today’s compact, streamlined frames and asymmetric shapes enable snowshoers to have a normal stance and natural stride. In an ascent or an incline (in contemporary snowshoes) your toe hinges freely from the bindings which give you more friction and better grip. At the same time, the tail of the snowshoe drops parallel with ground to lessen leg fatigue. In a descent or decline, the proper technique to maintain balance is to lean back and “ride” the heel section of the snowshoe.

Where To Snowshoe:
State parks, national forests, community recreation areas, nature centers, alpine and Nordic resorts, private woodlots, even your own backyard all provide new winter experiences via snowshoes. Park rangers, chambers of commerce, college outdoor clubs, regional snowmobile associations, and winter resorts are excellent sources of information and areas to explore on snowshoes.

Appropriate Footwear:
Warm, dry feet are essential to having fun in any winter sport. Choose waterproof hiking boots with gaiters for good ankle sport if you’re planning an extended hike in variable, or steep terrain. For a more casual snowshoe outing, insulated pack-style boots, rubber boots, or hiking footwear will work. Wool socks, with a silk or comparable liner against the foot, will absorb moisture and prevent chilling.

Appropriate Clothing:
Layers are the proper dress for this aerobic activity. Be prepared to be quite warm when trekking and to cool off quickly when stopped. To dress for comfort, choose lightweight, breathable long underwear, with wind absorbent layer of insulation – sweater or fleece – topped with wind resistant outerwear. Remember, warm head gear will conserve body heat and prevent chill.

Rental Prices at Deep Creek Lake Discovery Center:

$7.00/ set per 2 hours
$11.00/ set per half day (4 hours)
$13.00/ set per full day (7 hours)

Deep Creek Lake Discovery Center: (301) 387- 7067

National Gas Prices Take a Dip

With the snowflakes falling and the holiday season right around the corner, we are seeing an upside to the economy. Gas prices have dipped to a national average of $1.978 for a gallon of self-serve unleaded gasoline according to AAA. This is the first time since March of 2005 that we have seemed the gas prices drop below $2.00.

We are currently seeing our gas prices at $2.05 in the Deep Creek Lake area, which is not too bad for a resort area. Locals are enjoying the cheaper gas prices and lower fuel costs for their homes, while our guests to the area are enjoying a more affordable travel for their holiday season.

Wisp Resort is looking to open Friday, November 28th!

















Deep Creek Lake received their first big snowfall Monday and Tuesday of this week, accumulating about 6 inches. With more snow in the forecast, Wisp has been blowing snow all through the nights. Wisp has one of the world’s largest most energy-efficient snowmaking systems with computerized weather and pumping stations that are world-renowned for their efficiency! Locals, vacationers, and day trippers will be able to enjoy the 132 acre ski terrain over the Thanksgiving holiday. Not a skier or snowboarder? There are a number of activities for you to enjoy. Try horse drawn sleigh rides, snow mobile tours, mountain coaster rides, cross country skiing, dog sled tours, spas, shopping, and plenty of dining options to please anyone’s palette.